Dining

Restaurants

Megan's Kitchen

・美味廚

Rating

Date of reviewJan 16, 2015
Cuisine chinese - Cantonese
LocationWan Chai

5/F, Lucky Centre, 165-171 Wan Chai Road, Wan Chai, Wan Chai, Hong Kong
灣仔灣仔道165-171號樂基中心5樓

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Overview

Lunch hours

Mon to Sun, 12:00 noon - 3:00 pm

Dinner hours

Mon to Sun, 6:00 pm - 11:30 pm

Dress Code

Casual

Reservation

Yes

Buffet

No

Corkage

HK$100-$150/bottle

Private Room

9 rooms for 12 to 30

Accept Credit Card

Yes

Smoking Area

No

Review

Setting

As far as hotpot restaurants go, Megan’s Kitchen offers a pleasant environment for patrons. Tables are comfortably spread out in the well-lit dining room and bright white tablecloths effectively cover the induction cookers for added sleekness. The environment is upbeat with a noise level that communicates the excitement of guests convening over a hotpot meal.

Food

Megan’s Kitchen’s a la carte menu is loaded with a large number of Cantonese dishes – enough to order a full meal without any hotpot involved. Our appetiser of deep-fried tofu in salted egg batter presents savoury, crisp pieces of tofu with silky interiors, whetting the appetite for our impending hotpot feast. Guests are given the option of selecting up to three different soup bases per pot, and we diversified with one simple apple and corn soup with spare ribs, a rich Malaysian satay selection and their signature tomato and crab soup with a pronounced soufflé topping. Out of the three, the satay is the favourite and most robust in taste, while the corn and apple is perfect for preserving the natural flavours in the ingredients. After cutting through the soufflé topping and dipping into the tomato and crab base with gusto, we find it difficult to taste the individual flavours in the light and somewhat bland soup. The slices of local snowflake beef are quite thick and chewy, but not nearly as disappointing as the much more expensive M6 wagyu, which looks promising but is surprisingly rough on the tongue. The meal improves with the Hokkaido oysters – plump and briny – and the Fuzhou fish balls, which expand during the cooking process to infuse the meat inside with added juiciness.

Wine

The wine list is limited and they were sold out of some options when we visited. Megan’s Kitchen supplements their drink options with Japanese plum wine and sake, along with Chinese hua diao and mou tai wine.

Service

Our dishes arrived quickly and seamlessly, with no mistakes in ordering. The service was rather efficient and unobtrusive.

Price   $$$$$

A gluttonous meal for two (that could easily have fed three), plus three beers, comes to less than HK$2,000. Though we were disappointed with the quality of the expensive wagyu we ordered, we still feel that Megan’s Kitchen can offer good value for money if you stick to local options and attend with a larger group. 

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